Skip to main content

About this collection

Menominee Collection on the Termination and Restoration Era, 1961-1973


The Menominee Indian Tribe is a federally recognized tribe that currently resides on 235,000 acres of their original land in Northeast Wisconsin. Over 223,000 acres of that land is still heavily forested. This reservation is located approximately 45 miles northwest of Green Bay, Wisconsin. The Menominee have inhabited this land in the heart of their ancestral homeland since the present reservation was established in the Treaty of 1854.

 

In 1954, the Menominee Indian tribe was terminated under the federal termination policy that
stripped them of their status as a recognized federal tribe. During this period of termination the community suffered devastation to the self-identity of tribal members, loss of language, loss of culture and loss of additional land. They felt substantial effects of poverty as a result of the termination experiment. Also due to the termination act, Menominee County, Wisconsin's 72nd county, was created. Menominee County shares most of the same geographic boundaries as the reservation.

 

The 1973 Restoration Act allowed the Menominee Indian Tribe to restore their recognition as a federally recognized tribe. Today, the Menominee are making economic progress and consistently working towards self-sufficiency. The tribe felt it was imperative to access the skills and resources of one of its leading institutions to prioritize preservation and access to items related to the Menominee Termination and Restoration. The content of these materials are rare documents that do not exist anywhere else. They tell a personal, legal, and national story of the Menominee struggle for sovereignty.

 

Other Digital Collections from the College of Menominee Nation S. Verna Fowler Academic Library/Menominee Public Library

 

 

 

Browse all collections

 
Select the collections to add or remove from your search
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
 
OK